The Avenue

The Avenue was created in about 1880 when farmland previously owned by the Goodwin family was sold. Until then no roads opened out from the High Street and this was the first development in any direction beyond the village’s medieval core . A very old farmstead had stood at the point where the new road branched off the High Street, close to land which had already been bought by the South Western & Staines Railway Company. Their line was built through Datchet from 1847 to 1852.

Plots in this road, and in Montagu Road to which it leads, were bought by developers for building popular Victorian’villas’. These appealed to the middle classes but were not over-sized. The southern end of The Avenue opened towards the river and attracted richer clients who commissioned larger and grander houses for themselves.

Click on the headings below for house history pages:

Numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, 9,11, The Avenue

Three semi-detached pairs of houses These houses  were built between 1875 and 1881, when they first appear in the 10-yearly census. From the outside they appear quite modest in size and local in style, with their red-detailed brickwork and barge-boards ...
Swancourt, originally Leyfield (address Southlea Road)

Swancourt, originally Leyfield (address Southlea Road)

Leyfield and the Mocatta Family (Listed here rather than in Southlea Road because it is so close to The Avenue.) Leyfield was built in 1879 for Benjamin Elkin Mocatta, one of a long-established London family of Jewish gold bullion dealers and...
Swanmead and Bryntirion, 17 & 19 The Avenue

Swanmead and Bryntirion, 17 & 19 The Avenue

This very large pair of semi-detached houses first appears in the census in 1891, but the occupants of both were listed in Kelly's Directory for 1883, a date similar to the other houses in this newly laid out road. They are very odd-looking, and...
The Maisonette & Old Leigh Court, 23 & 25 The Avenue

The Maisonette & Old Leigh Court, 23 & 25 The Avenue

  Introduction The Maisonette was built for Dr Samuel Osborn in 1882 by the  architect Ernest Newton (drawing from journal, The American Builder ). Osborn lived here until his death in 1936 and by about 1950 the house had been divided into two d...