Slough Road

Until the late 1800s there were no houses along this frequently flooded ‘watery lane’ that led to Upton, originally a more significant place than Slough. From the top of the present Queens Road there were just open fields with a stream running alongside the lane, now culverted underground. During Datchet’s boom years from the 1870s big family houses were built here by people seeking country living with easy access to London, but most of the land on the east side of the road towards the M4 still remains agricultural. In the late 1930s the developer Nelson Masters built the row of substantial houses which lie back from the road opposite Churchmead’s entrance.


Moy Lodge, 11 Slough Road

Moy Lodge, 11 Slough Road

This very unusual big bungalow was built in the 1880s and originally named The Chalet. Its proportions, structure and distinctive detailing are reminiscent of a Malaysian tea-planter's house, and there is a likely reason for this: By 1891 there were ...
Swallowfield

Swallowfield

The Poor's Land and the Swallowfield Houses These four houses were built by the Trustees of Datchet Charities in the early 1900s. In the past, the church authorities were responsible for the poor of the parish and many bequests were made t...
The Red House & Red House Cottage

The Red House & Red House Cottage

Charles Bellairs and the Red House Charles William Bellairs was born in 1861, the seventh son of Rev Canon Henry Walford Bellairs and Mary Hannah Albina. His father was an HM Inspector of Schools and a clergyman in Oxford. By 1881 Charles was a clerk...